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Barrier Birth Control

Barrier Birth Control

Intrauterine devices (IUDs)

  • An IUD is a small t-shaped device that’s inserted into the uterus. There are 2 types of IUDs.

Hormonal IUD

  • Made of plastic and contains a small amount of the hormone progesterone.
  • The hormone is slowly released at low levels, which thins the uterus
  • lining and thickens cervical mucus, making it difficult for the sperm to
  • fertilize an egg and attach to the uterus wall.
  • Effective for 3 to 5 years depending on the brand used.
  • 99% effective.
  • Requires a prescription.
  • Requires a health care professional to insert.

Copper IUD

  • Made of plastic and copper.
  • Copper destroys sperm so it can’t fertilize an egg.
  • If the sperm does meet an egg the IUD prevents it from attaching to
  • the uterus wall.
  • Can be inserted as emergency contraception within 7 days of
  • unprotected intercourse.
  • Effective for 3 to 10 years depending on the brand used.
  • 99% effective.
  • Requires a prescription.
  • Requires a health care professional to insert.

Advantages

  • There is nothing to do before having intercourse.
  • A good method for people who are breastfeeding (after 6 weeks postpartum).
  • It’s immediately reversible with no long-term effects on fertility.
  • Reduced cost over time compared to other methods.

Disadvantages

No protection against STIs.
  • May cause irregular menstrual periods.
  • Requires a visit to a health care provider.
  • Copper IUDs may cause increased bleeding during periods, longer periods or more cramping.
  • Copper IUDs have a higher rate of pregnancy occurring (8 in 1,000 pregnancies yearly).
  • Hormonal IUDs may have side effects such as breast tenderness, mood changes and increased acne.
  • Initial expense.

External or male condom

How does it work?

  • A thin sheath usually made of latex.
  • Also available in polyurethane (for people with latex allergies).
  • Covers an erect penis.
  • Blocks the sperm from meeting the egg.
  • Should only be used with a water-based lubricant.
  • Can be used with hormonal birth control methods to increase effectiveness.
  • Easily accessible.

Advantages

Helps prevent sexual transmitted infections (STIs).
  • 85 to 98% effective.
  • Available from a variety of locations such as pharmacies, grocery stores and community health centres. No need to see a doctor or health care provider. Both partners can buy and carry condoms.

Disadvantages

  • Need to have a condom before engaging in sexual activity.
  • Lubricants on condoms or latex allergies may cause irritation.
  • May break.
  • A new condom needs to be used every time you have sex.

How to use

  1. Check the expiry date and the package for an air bubble by pressing on it.
  2. Use your fingers to open the package on the serrated edge.
  3. Pinch the tip of the condom and place it on an erect penis.
  4. Roll the condom down to the base of the penis.
  5. Lube, with a water-based lubricant.
  6. When finished, hold the condom and pull the penis out. Remove condom from the penis while it is still hard.
  7. Check that the condom has not broken or that semen has spilled. If it has, seek emergency contraception and/or STI testing. Wrap the condom in tissue and throw it away in a garbage with a lid.

Internal or female condom

How does it work?

  • A polyurethane sheath that contains 2 rings.
  • 1 ring is inserted into the top of the vagina and the other ring sits outside the opening of the vagina to fit the shape of the vagina.
  • The penis goes inside the condom during sex.
  • Can also be used for anal sex.

Advantages

Helps prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • 79 to 95% effective.
  • No need to see a doctor or health care provider.
  • Non-latex, so may be used by people who have latex allergies.

Disadvantages

  • Need to have a condom before engaging in sexual activity.
  • Must ensure the penis goes into the condom and not beside it.
  • May make noise during intercourse.
  • Not easily accessible throughout Yukon.

How to use

  1. Check the expiration date.
  2. Open the package along the serrated edge.
  3. Use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the sides of the inner ring together.
  4. For vaginal sex: Insert the condom into the vagina as far as it can go. Let the outer ring hang about an inch outside the vagina. Insert the penis, making sure it doesn’t go in between the condom and vaginal walls.
  5. For anal sex: The steps are the same as vaginal sex, but the inner ring is removed.
  6. After sex, twist the outer ring to keep semen inside the condom.
  7. Gently pull the condom out of the vagina or anus.
  8. Check that the condom has not broken or that semen has not spilled. If it has, seek emergency contraception and/or STI testing.
  9. Wrap the condom in tissue and throw away in a garbage with a lid.
Note: Condoms are available for FREE at community health centres, hospitals and Yukon Communicable Disease Control. Some restaurants, bars, community organizations (e.g., Blood Ties Four Directions), and First Nations provide condoms for free. Condoms and water-based lube are available in the pharmacy section of many stores.

Internal or female condom

How does it work?

  • A polyurethane sheath that contains 2 rings.
  • 1 ring is inserted into the top of the vagina and the other ring sits outside the opening of the vagina to fit the shape of the vagina.
  • The penis goes inside the condom during sex.
  • Can also be used for anal sex.

Advantages

Helps prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • 79 to 95% effective.
  • No need to see a doctor or health care provider.
  • Non-latex, so may be used by people who have latex allergies.

Disadvantages

  • Need to have a condom before engaging in sexual activity.
  • Must ensure the penis goes into the condom and not beside it.
  • May make noise during intercourse.
  • Not easily accessible throughout Yukon.

How to use

  1. Check the expiration date.
  2. Open the package along the serrated edge.
  3. Use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the sides of the inner ring together.
  4. For vaginal sex:
    1. Insert the condom into the vagina as far as it can go.
    2. Let the outer ring hang about an inch outside the vagina.
    3. Insert the penis, making sure it doesn’t go in between the condom and vaginal walls.
  5. For anal sex:
    1. The steps are the same as vaginal sex, but the inner ring is removed.
  6. After sex, twist the outer ring to keep semen inside the condom.
  7. Gently pull the condom out of the vagina or anus.
  8. Check that the condom has not broken or that semen has not spilled. If it has, seek emergency contraception and/or STI testing.
  9. Wrap the condom in tissue and throw away in a garbage with a lid.
Note: Condoms are available for FREE at community health centres, hospitals and Yukon Communicable Disease Control. Some restaurants, bars, community organizations (e.g., Blood Ties Four Directions), and First Nations provide condoms for free. Condoms and water-based lube are available in the pharmacy section of many stores.

 

Ask Us

Yukoners can email a sexual health and relationship question anytime;

or call Mon-Fri from 9am to 9pm (1-800-SEX-SENSE / 1-800-739-7367)

Questions will be answered by OPT BC's Sexual Health Educators.