Page Hero

Decision Making

Sexual Decision Making

Someone MAY be ready when

  • They are not pressured.
  • They can talk to their partner about sex.
  • They know how to avoid unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • They have considered the pros and cons of becoming sexually active.
  • They’ve explored what feels good for them through masturbation.
  • They feel comfortable to show their partner what feels good for them.
  • They have talked about what to do if an unwanted pregnancy occurs or an STI is transmitted.
Bottom Line: NO ONE should be pressured to be sexual before they feel ready.

Someone may NOT be ready IF

  • They feel pressured.
  • They are not sure about sex.
  • They can’t talk to their partner about sex.
  • They don’t have a way to protect themselves from STIs and unwanted pregnancy.
  • They need to get drunk or stoned to have sex.
  • Their partner needs to get drunk or stoned to have sex.
  • They had sex before and it didn’t feel like the right choice.

If someone is being pressured to have sex, it’s important they know how to say NO. Here are some statements and responses people use.
“You would if you loved me.”

Response: “There are other ways to show our love. I’m not ready.”

“Everybody does it?”

Response: “Not everybody. Not me. It’s really important for me to wait until I decide I’m ready.”

“But, I love you. When you love someone, it’s the right thing to do.”

Response: “If you really love me you’ll respect my feelings and my right to say no.”

“I need you. I have to have you now.”

Response: “If I can wait, so can you.”

“You did it for (name of a person). So, what’s wrong with me? Do you think you’re too good for me?”

Response: “I decide when and if I want to have sex. It’s not about you.”

“If you don’t, then I’ll find someone else who will.”

Response: “If that’s all I mean to you, that’s what you’ll have to do. I’m not ready yet.”

Ask Us

Yukoners can email a sexual health and relationship question anytime;

or call Mon-Fri from 9am to 9pm (1-800-SEX-SENSE / 1-800-739-7367)

Questions will be answered by OPT BC's Sexual Health Educators.