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Prevention

Prevention

  • Get an STI test before and after every partner.
  • Use a condom or oral dam during sexual activity.
  • Limit your number of partners.
  • Keep sex toys clean and cover them with a condom.
  • Avoid oral and genital sex if there are cuts or sores present.
  • Keep up to date with immunizations.   

How to use an external condom.

  1. Check the expiry date and the package for an air bubble by pressing on it.
  2. Open the package on the serrated edge with fingers.
  3. Pinch the tip of the condom and place it on an erect penis.
  4. Roll the condom down to the base of the penis.
  5. Lube, with a water-based lubricant.
  6. When finished, hold the condom and pull the penis out. Remove condom from the penis while it’s still hard.
  7. Check that the condom has not broken or that semen has spilled. If it has, seek emergency contraception and/or STI testing. Wrap the condom in tissue and throw it away in a garbage with a lid.

How to use an internal condom.

  1. Check the expiration date.
  2. Open the package along the serrated edge.
  3. Use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the sides of the inner ring together.
  4. Insert the condom into the vagina as far as it can go.
  5. Let the outer ring hang about an inch outside the vagina.
  6. Insert the penis, making sure it doesn’t go in between the condom and vaginal walls.
  7. For anal sex, the steps are the same, but the inner ring is removed.
  8. After sex, twist the outer ring to keep semen inside the condom.
  9. Gently pull the condom out of the vagina or anus.
  10. Check that the condom has not broken or that semen has not spilled. If it has, seek emergency contraception and/or STI testing.
  11. Wrap the condom in tissue and throw it away in a garbage with a lid.

How to use an oral dam

  1. Check the expiry date.
  2. Open the package.
  3. Unfold the dam and look for damage.
  4. Lay the oral dam across the vulva or anus.
  5. After oral sex, throw the oral dam away in a garbage with a lid.

Sometimes oral dams can be difficult to find, but there are a couple of different ways to make them using a condom. Here is 1 way.

  1. Open the package and remove the external condom.
  2. Make a small cut in the rim.
  3. Unroll the condom and you now have a rectangle.
  4. Lay the oral dam across the vulva or anus.
  5. After oral sex, throw the oral dam away in a garbage with a lid.

What if someone does not want to use a condom or oral dam?

If someone does not want to use protection, for any reason, it’s important to say “no”. Here are some phrases people use.

“Don’t worry. We can pull out in time.”
Response: “STIs can be transferred without a condom and pregnancy can still occur. If we don’t use a condom, we can’t have sex.”

“I’m allergic to condoms.”
Response: “There are 2 kinds of condoms: latex and non-latex. Let’s get the one that you’re not allergic to.”

“Partners who are committed to each other don’t use condoms.”
Response: “There are still risks of unwanted pregnancy and STIs. Let’s not take that chance.”

“We are using birth control and our STI tests came back negative.”
Response: “Birth control is not 100%. It’s safer to use condoms, too.”

“We don’t have a condom, it’s probably fine this once.”
Response: “Any time we have sex without a condom, there is a chance to spread STIs and get pregnant. Let’s get some condoms.”
“I don’t have an oral dam, but I still want to go down on you.” Response: “We can make one out of a condom; let me show you how.”

“Oral dams taste weird, let’s not use one.”
Response: “We can use a flavoured one; let’s try a couple different kinds.”

“We are just having oral sex we don’t need a condom or an oral dam.”
Response: “STIs can spread during oral sex; we need to use protection.”

“You can’t get pregnant during anal sex so let’s not use a condom.”
Response: “STIs can spread during anal sex so we need to use protection.

Ask Us

Yukoners can email a sexual health and relationship question anytime;

or call Mon-Fri from 9am to 9pm (1-800-SEX-SENSE / 1-800-739-7367)

Questions will be answered by OPT BC's Sexual Health Educators.